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Chasing the Sun..

..could have been the perfect title to this article if it wasn’t for its rampant (mis)use and further transformation into a cliché. Anyway, this article is about the sun and how one goes about capturing it in various different situations.

Let’s start with the situations. Sunsets are relatively easy, since they are in the middle of the day and you don’t necessarily have to wake up before dawn to catch them. It’s the sunrises that can be tough, even before you think about your camera.

Talking about Sunrises, getting up in time is always an issue but that’s your problem. If by chance you happen to be in Africa and on the Eastern side of the continent, make sure you get in early every night and wake up in time for the rise every single morning. Each morning is different and so are the ways the sun chooses to rise every different day. This is true for most places in the world though. The morning mist has a profound effect on the colours you will see. Plus the darks in the foreground will force you to work harder to get that perfect shot.

The Pangong Tso By day.

Rising early in the mountains.

I was there, I didn’t wake up every day and I suffered. I had the chance to shoot around twenty five sunrises but ended up shooting just about ten. Sometimes I wonder what beautiful shots I could have got. So try not to make the same mistake I did, if photography is your aim with travel.

Also, since I assume you are now going to get up early tomorrow morning, make sure you have had your trip to the loo before you head out. Yes, I know, it may sound funny when you read this but there are only a few things worse than knowing that the perfect sunrise is about to happen and then realising that you’ve got to head to the crapper. It has happened to me, more than once, it makes you feel like what you’re ‘doing’.

The day I missed it.

The day I missed it.

Okay, Sunsets as I said are easier but only by way of not having for you to wake up at an unearthly hour. Everything else, while shooting the sun in the evening is more or less similar to when you take a shot at the early morning sun. Here though, unlike early mornings where the light consistently increases you will face the opposite situation. The light will vanish quicker than you can change lenses, so be prepared.

To judge the amount of time I have before the sun sets at the horizon, I use the FFF or the four fingers forecast. It’s simple, hold out your arm with your palm folded in an L shape and line it up between (just below) the sun and your eye. Each fingers gap between the sun and the horizon will give you about 10 to 15 minutes, so you have a rough idea about when it’s going to get over. If you are reading this at the North or South Pole by any chance, do not bother, you probably have other things to worry about. (Carry a Neutral Density filter if you ACTUALLY do happen to head to the poles).

I'm not alone.

When you still have a while.

Many ask me, do you walk around when shooting a sunset or sunrise or do you stay in one place and shoot from there and around?

Well, it depends on the drama. Yes, the amount of drama present in the frame when I’m shooting decides whether I move about or not. Take for instance, if I’m shooting a sunset where the sun is actively playing with the clouds or rain and every second picture has the light of a different shade, then, I would choose to sit tight mostly. On the other hand if the sun isn’t in a mood for dance, I move around and look for subjects which will make the sun a more interesting part of the frame. It’s a personal choice, really. Here is what can happen when you walk around with a plain and clear sunset.

Somewhere I can find peace.

When it’s plain, saunter.

This photograph is being curated by National Geographic Stock.

Shooting on a beach can be rather pleasant as you may encounter everything from crabs to couples and have a good time while at it. Scan the horizon through your camera for any interesting subjects that your naked eye may not deem photogenic. Reflections have an uncanny ability to give great shots, especially on the wet sands, right after a wave retreats. Even flowing water can make for a great photograph.

I see myself.

Inducing reflections.

When in the mountains, hurry! The sun will come up slightly late (for your eyes) and set before you know it. Tall mountains can be a tricky place to take a picture if you know what I mean. Not always will you be able to get a good exposure on the mammoth rock faces. Hang in there and keep an eye on the changing light, as the sun sets, the hues of the sky will change and the mountain faces will gleam with shades of orange and yellow, which is a highly ideal situation.

Himalayan Hues.

Gleaming grandeur.

As anyone who knows their job will tell you, timing is everything. Anticipate shots, try and make good photographs great by using what is around or by changing your position if you can. Go lower, go higher or try something unusual. Making mistakes is an integral learning chapter of photography. Who knows? It may just pay off.

Walk with me.

Walk with me.

Better Photography Magazine, February 2011.

The power of will is a major factor in any endeavour and taking photographs is no different. Persevere and persevere.

Now what?

Its evening and the sun has just slipped under the horizon. Don’t pack up that camera just yet, instead, take out the tripod and get ready for some long exposures. You will be surprised at the low light long exposure images you may capture. Forget the flash. There is a lot of fun to be had, after the sun goes down! If you know what I mean.

Jump!

Jump!

A lot many people who tot cameras will tell you that you should have used this or that filter and other blah blah, the common denominator will turn out to be the CPL or the circular polarizer. Yes it will help you a lot when you do get the hang of using it but let me tell you one thing, it is expensive and can be quite a headache if you decide to shoot the sun or its light with a different lens and end up wanting a CPL for that lens too. So I say, sit tight and use what you have. All the pictures you see on this particular post are shot without the all-important CPL.

Clean that lens before you shoot, okay?


– Nipun Srivastava

Want to see more photographs of the Sun? Click here.

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9 responses

  1. Harshal Magar

    Nice Work Bro….

    April 22, 2012 at 3:46 pm

  2. Sweet shots dude…

    April 22, 2012 at 3:45 pm

  3. bhagirath

    too good man…fab stuff:)

    September 2, 2011 at 9:13 pm

  4. AMAZING 🙂 THANX FOR SHARING

    September 2, 2011 at 2:29 am

  5. Superb !!

    September 1, 2011 at 11:08 pm

  6. i like,,,, i likes……….. nice goin… 😀

    September 1, 2011 at 7:13 pm

  7. TheBlackTwig

    Wow! There are times when beauty makes your eyes swell with tears. Your photos do! I love all of them.

    September 1, 2011 at 6:26 pm

  8. wow really stunning

    September 1, 2011 at 6:25 pm

  9. Παναγιώτης

    likeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

    September 1, 2011 at 5:59 pm

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